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How to Fix Hardwood Flooring

hardwood flooring is always present in old houses. It is almost not possible to find an old house without it. And yet, it seems to be disappearing nowadays, as people do not realize how long-lasting and resilient it can be. Unknowing contractors and homeowners, cover-up or rip up this amazing flooring when used for another century, thus, a lot of money could actually be saved. 

aside from refinishing hardwood flooring, the most common repair the professional hardwood floor repair Calgary service providers offer is the board replacement. It might seem daunting to get rid of the tongue as well as the groove flooring board without causing damages to the nearby boards however, with some DIY tips of the trade, the following can get it right if you are brave enough to handle this task on your own: 

  1. Get Rid of the Damaged or Worn Floor Boards

Whether it is pet stains or termites, some floorboards will be inevitably beyond saving. If you find these floorboards, you will have to get rid of them totally and look for a suitable or decent replacement. It is also very essential for you to take the whole board, or at least disassemble the joints. This will basically let the patch to complement with your current flooring system. You will also need some of the tools and equipment to get your task done the right way such as: 

  • Hammer 
  • Wood Chisel 
  • Circular Saw 
  • Trim Pry Bar or Cat’s Paw 
  • Brad Nailer 
  • Multi-Took (highly recommended to have) 

Mark the Floor Boards 

Mark the floorboards for you to remove very clearly along the whole length so that mistakes will be lessened or eliminated. 

Identify Thickness 

You will need to determine how thick boards are, and this step is very crucial. You also need to do this so you may set the depth of your cut on the circular saw appropriately. Most old wood floorings are at least half an inch or one inch, in particular. The best place for you to determine the depth is to pull up a threshold or eliminate a floor heat register. However, the threshold is a bit lesser fun. 

Set the Depth of the Cut 

Once you determine the thickness of the floor, set your circular saw just to a hair-like deeper compared to the thickness of your floor (approximately 1/32 of an inch). 

Cut Two Lines 

Make two parallel plunge cuts into your flooring board along its length using your circular saw. Begin and end as close you could to the corners without crossing into your next floorboard. You will actually be cutting the floorboard into 3 thin boards. One piece of board will have the groove, one piece the tongue and the other in the middle piece is the free-floating. 

Finish Your Cut Using the Multi-Tool 

In order to end your cut, you will require a chisel or multi-tool. Cut a small amount of wood which remains to the end of your flooring board so that all 3 pieces are totally independent of each other.